Mystical Bioethics Network

Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 9 (1999), 177.


If you are interested in the Mystical Bioethics Network , please contact both:

Frank J. Leavitt, Ph.D.
Chairman, The Centre for Asian and International Bioethics
Faculty of Health Sciences
Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel
Fax: + 972-7-6477633
Email: yeruham@bgumail.bgu.ac.il
AND:
- Erin D. Williams, Esq.
Associate Director, Law, Policy and Ethics
Foundation for Genetic Medicine, Inc.
l0900 University Blvd, MSN 4E3
Manassas, VA 20ll0, USA
Email: EWilliams@GeneticMedicine.org
The following letter from Alamelu continues the discussion which Dr Verma once started in this column, about whether we should share mystical ideas with younger students and researchers. Although I have personally always favoured openness, I favour it even more nowadays because of experiences which I have had meeting quite young students, from whom I learned that insight into spirituality and ethics really has no connection with age. I know young students who -- in my opinion -- have deeper insights into these things than do I and many of older colleagues. (Yeruham Frank Leavitt)
Bioethics and Higher States
- S. Alamelu
Project Assistant,Primate Research Laboratory,
Molecular Reprodutive Development and Genetics, Indian Institute of Science.
Bangalore -560 012, INDIA.
Email: alamelu@m-net.arbornet.org.in

With respect to your discussion about bioethics to higher states.I strongly believe that in giving any views regarding any field-espicially Ethical issues, there should be openness. This will create awareness within the subjects of our interest. In turn this can contribute to responsibility as well as commitment towards any kind of work they do. I find there is absolutely no need for us to hide our views, which in no way is going to hinder ongoing knowledge- based research's. In short, although Dr. Verma wishes to avoid stationary phase in the Knowledge flow, The need for discrimination between the researchers is not required.

To elaborate on this view: 1. The real inquisitiveness of human begins always continues, no matter how much has already been explained. 2. This being the fact, then there is all the more need for us to keep explaining things in an even more explicit manner. 3. In turn we can expect at least a few students and younger researchers to respond and act responsibily .e.g.,use of experimental animals for research.

I would appreciate it if i can get feedback over this idea.
My Grandfather, John Lane Williams, once said, "If a brilliant person gains a good education but one that excludes all reference to spiritual life, that person has a better chance of becoming a more clever crook."

I want to echo the sentiments of my colleagues stated above and below. Openness to wisdom facilitates and allows for transcendent leaps in all fields of study, including science and ethics. Humans have the tremendous capacity to learn from both the physical world, and also the intuitive, or spiritual realm. For the broadest understanding, we should allow for both in our professions. Eureka! Intuitions can become ideas and theories that may then be tested, modified, and / or expanded with experience in the physical realm. Science provides one terrific tool for such endeavors. Similarly, notions we have discovered through science can be more fully understood and beneficially applied for us all when they are allowed to interact with wisdom we have accumulated during our lifetimes.

Neither the physical nor the spiritual way of knowing should be forsaken for the other. Forsaking our physical knowledge, at its worst, can lead to fanatical views, intolerance, and irresponsible behaviors. Forsaking our spiritual knowledge, at its worst, can lead to a callous, hurtful actions intended to conquer nature and each other, ultimately for the happiness of no one. Using both the gifts of spiritual and physical knowledge, both of which may be available to people of all ages, our ethics may reflect our highest shared aspirations. (Erin D. Williams)
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